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Using Our Amish Water Bath Canner

After we cleaned the tomatoes, we placed them into a pot of boiling water for about 1 minute, then plunged them into an ice bath.  Once they are in the ice bath, their skins slip right off.  We removed the blossom end and quartered the tomatoes.

We finally invested in an Amish Water Bath Canner for large-batch water bath canning.  Being able to process large batches has really made the process much less time consuming.  

Every year we've started out the mid-summer canning season with garden-fresh tomatoes.   This year's first canning session we filled 23 pint jars of our garden-fresh tomatoes & here's how we processed them.

 

 

First we cleaned the tomatoes.  We loaded all of the jars into the dishwasher for a wash while we continued to process the tomatoes.

 

We set the canning area up to fill the jars right out of the pan on  the stove top.  

Once the jar was filled after adding the 1/4 teaspoon of citric acid, we de-bubbled by using a skewer to release any trapped air bubbles. 

The lids were tightened "finger-tight" to ready for the water bath.

Once loaded, we put the lid on the water bath canner and set the timer for 90 minutes while the jars are submerged with about 2" of water over the top of the jars.  

Once the tomatoes were quartered, they were placed in a large pot and brought to a boil while stirring so not to burn.

Each quart jar received a 1/4 teaspoon of citric acid before filling with the hot tomatoes.  

The jar rims were cleaned with a paper towel that had been dipped into a vinegar water solution.

We use a jar gripper to slowly load the jars into the water bath canner.  

The Amish Canner takes two burners to heat the water to a boil.  They can be stacked with two layers of 1/2 pints or pint jars or just one level of quart jars.  

Having this large-batch Amish Canner saved us a lot of time and energy just running one batch of 23 pint jars.

We can't wait to enjoy these homegrown tomatoes this winter for a fresh taste of Summer-time tomatoes!

Next we set them onto a towel to cool.  After 24 hours we removed the screw band, tested the seal, washed the jars & attached a label with the process time, date, and ingredients.

We can't wait to open up a homemade jar of our own garden-grown, pesticide-free tomatoes from this years harvest!