google.com, pub-7492931051063262, DIRECT, f08c47fec0942fa0 google.com, pub-7492931051063262, DIRECT, f08c47fec0942fa0 Confusing Choices of Antibiotics for Goats

Confusing Choices of Antibiotics

Updated: Sep 14, 2019

How do you choose an antibiotic when they all list their ingredients as oxytetracycline?

Choosing an antibiotic for your goat can be daunting when all of the labels read practically the same.  There are a few choices and what I have read, some are not pleasant drugs to administer or for the animal to receive. (Larger gauge needles, 18 gauge is recommended, because of the thickness of the medication.) So how do you choose when the labels pretty much say the same thing?


Note all the following are considered off-label use for goats which by law requires the use and administration to be given under the guidance of a licensed veterinarian. Therefore, this information is for educational purposes only and use should be under the care and guidance of your veterinarian.


Agrimycin 200 is a long-lasting, broad-spectrum antibiotic containing 200 mg oxytetracycline per ml. Agrimycin 200 is effective in the treatment of pinkeye, footrot and pneumonia. For use in beef cattle, dairy cattle, calves, and swine. Provides therapeutic levels of oxytetracycline in the blood for 3 days. Most animals show a noticeable improvement within 24 to 48 hours. Give 4.5 ml per 100 pounds IM or SQ in neck.


What's in a label? How do you make the best choice?

LA-200 is described as LA-200 is a long-lasting, broad-spectrum antibiotic containing 200 mg oxytetracycline per ml. LA-200 is effective in the treatment of a wide range of diseases, including pinkeye, footrot and pneumonia. For use in beef cattle, dairy cattle, calves, and swine. Approved for 96 hour milkout. LA-200 provides therapeutic levels of oxytetracycline in the blood for 3 days. Most animals show a noticeable improvement within 24 to 48 hours. Give 4.5 ml per 100 pounds IM or SQ in neck.


Bio-Mycin 200 is a long-lasting, broad-spectrum antibiotic containing 200 mg oxytetracycline per ml. Bio-Mycin 200 is effective in the treatment of a wide range of diseases, including pinkeye, footrot, and pneumonia. For use in beef cattle, dairy cattle, calves, and swine. Approved for 96 hour milkout. Bio-Mycin 200 provides therapeutic levels of oxytetracycline in the blood for 3 days. Most animals show a noticeable improvement within 24 to 48 hours. Give 4.5 ml per 100 pounds IM or SQ in neck.


Vetrimycin-200 is a long-lasting, broad-spectrum antibiotic containing 200 mg oxytetracycline per ml. Vetrimycin-200 is effective in the treatment of pinkeye, footrot and pneumonia. For use in beef cattle, dairy cattle, calves, and swine. Provides therapeutic levels of oxytetracycline in the blood for 3 days. Most animals show a noticeable improvement within 24 to 48 hours. Give 4.5 ml per 100 pounds IM or SQ in neck.

Bio-Mycin 200 which, like all the others, is 200 mg of oxytetracycline, is a long-lasting, broad spectrum antibiotic that is not as painful for the goat to have injected with. 

Bio-Mycin 200 - Recommended by G.F. Kennedy DVM

Another choice  is a prescription antibiotic,  Nuflor that is recommended for goats. Nuflor (Florfenicol) Injectable Solution for Cattle is an antibiotic indicated for the treatment of bovine respiratory disease (BRD) and foot rot, and for the control of respiratory disease in cattle at high risk for developing BRD. Each ml of Nuflor Injectable Solution contains 300 mg florfenicol. For treatment of BRD or foot rot, the recommended dosage is 3 ml per 100 lbs body weight, given by IM injection. A second dose should be given 48 hours later. Alternatively, Nuflor can be administered once by SQ injection of 6 ml per 100 lbs. For control of respiratory disease in cattle at high risk for BRD, administer 6 ml per 100 lbs, given SQ in the neck. Do not administer more than 10 ml per injection site. For use in beef and non-lactating dairy cattle only. Not for use in female dairy cattle 20 months of age or older, or in calves to be processed for veal. Florfenicol.


In one of my veterinarian authored goat care books, Pipestone's Veterinary Guide to Sheep & Goats, Dr. Kennedy recommends the use of either over-the-counter Bio-Mycin or Nuflor which requires a veterinarian to write a prescription for you to purchase.


What I found interesting, was that Dr. Kennedy's recommended dose differs from the label direction. Dr. Kennedy recommends both LA-200 and Bio-Mycin 200 because of the over-the-counter availability. The book states that Bio-Mycin is preferred for goats.


If our veterinarian is not available, we need to be able to make a best guess choice for our animals health and we want to make those choices based upon the advice and guidance of a veterinarian if possible. Our next best choice is Veterinarian Books, University Studies, Extension Services, professional organizations and trusted breeders and friends.


How do you make health decisions for your goats care? We'd love to hear!

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